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Department of Agronomy

Department of Agronomy
Kansas State University
2004 Throckmorton PSC
1712 Claflin Road
Manhattan, KS 66506-0110

Ph: +1-785-532-6101
Fx: +1-785-532-6094

Phillip Stahlman

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Professor

Weed Scientist
1232 240th Avenue
K-State Agricultural Research Center | Hays
Hays, KS 67601
Phone: 785-625-3425
Fax: 785-623-4369
stahlman@ksu.edu
 
Website: Western Kansas Agricultural Research Center
 

Biography and Education

Biography

Phil Stahlman, professor and research weed scientist, has been in charge of weed management research in dry land cropping systems since 1976. His research focuses on weed-crop interactions, integrated weed management strategies, and evaluation and development of experimental herbicides.

Education

Ph.D. Agronomy/Weed Science, University of Wyoming, 1989
M.S. Agronomy/Weed Science, North Dakota State University, 1973
B.S. Agronomy, Oklahoma Panhandle State College, 1970

Staff and Students

Research

The goal is to improve current or develop new safe and efficient weed management strategies in dry land cropping systems including ways to reduce risks of soil erosion and crop failure through plant residue and soil water management. Basic and applied studies in weed ecology, weed-crop competition, herbicide efficacy, environmental fate, crop tolerance, and cultural agronomics are conducted to assess the impact of weed interference, determine critical weed density thresholds, discover ways to optimize herbicide performance and crop safety, and integrate cultural and chemical control methods. Experimental and non-labeled herbicides are evaluated to assess their fit and potential usefulness in semi-arid dry land cropping systems.

Weed Management Strategies

Link to More Research Information

The goal is to improve current or develop new safe and efficient weed management strategies in dry land cropping systems including ways to reduce risks of soil erosion and crop failure through plant residue and soil water management. Basic and applied studies in weed ecology, weed-crop competition, herbicide efficacy, environmental fate, crop tolerance, and cultural agronomics are conducted to assess the impact of weed interference, determine critical weed density thresholds, discover ways to optimize herbicide performance and crop safety, and integrate cultural and chemical control methods. Experimental and non-labeled herbicides are evaluated to assess their fit and potential usefulness in semi-arid dry land cropping systems.

Corn Research

Corn herbicide research at the station is devoted to development of new and maintenance of existing herbicide technology in dryland and limited-irrigation production systems. All of these areas of research are integrated to determine the weed management programs that are most cost effective for the producers of our area. Read More...

Grain Sorghum Research

Grain sorghum herbicide research under the direction of Dr. Stahlman is devoted to the development of new and maintenance of existing weed management programs in the western Great Plains. Since grain sorghum is a popular crop in Western Kansas, research will continue on weed control programs as well as other biological aspects of sorghum production. Read More...

Soybean Research

The ARCH Weed Science group has a study evaluating the environmental effects of using Roundup technology. This study includes using Roundup Ready soybeans in the cropping system and is scheduled to be completed in a few years. Other research in soybeans has included evaluating treatments to control volunteer corn from Roundup Ready corn the previous year. Read More...

Sunflower Research

Weed control in sunflower is a challenge. Grass control is typically not too difficult due to the availability of several graminicides (grass herbicides). Broadleaf weeds, on the other hand, are quite a challenge. Most herbicides that control common broadleaf weeds found in sunflowers also control the crop itself! Therefore, many studies are geared towards evaluating crop tolerance and weed control for various herbicide combinations. Read More...

Wheat Research

Along with several long-term jointed goatgrass projects in wheat and recropping studies, the group conducts countless herbicide performance trials each season. Wheat research at the Ag Research Center will continue to expand as more advanced technology becomes available. Read More...

Recropping Studies

Managing winter wheat can be a challenge in Western Kansas. Some years drought or other natural phenomenon occur that destroys a wheat crop. The remedy for this is either to replant wheat or revert to a summer crop. Recent studies conducted by the Weed Science group at the Ag Research Center in Hays has evaluated the effects of recropping to crops such as soybean, corn, grain sorghum, forage sorghum, and alfalfa. Read More...

Biology Research

Dr. Stahlman has put together a strong research program on crop-weed interference, weed thresholds, and the effects of cultural practices in various cropping systems. We currently have several studies looking as various aspects of weed biology in multiple cropping systems. Read More...

Jointed Goatgrass

The Weed Science group at the KSU Ag Research Center-Hays is heavily involved in jointed goatgrass research. They are currently conducting three long-term experiments. Projects are funded by the National Jointed Goatgrass Research Program, Kansas Wheat Commission and BASF. Read More...

  • Controlling Jointed Goatgrass in winter Wheat Rotations Using Cultural Practices
  • Clearfield Winter Wheat Risk Assessment
    • Prolonging Clearfield Technology with Certified Seed and Crop Rotation
  • Characterization of Post Dispersal Jointed Goatgrass Seed Predation